Coronavirus is Placing College Sports on Hold, Putting Students, University Budgets, and Entire Towns At Risk

On college football Saturdays, tiny Clemson, South Carolina (pop. 17,000), turns into a city of 150,000 when fanatics pour into downtown and swarm Memorial Stadium, home of the Tigers. Some don’t even have a ticket to the game, but they come with money to burn.
“It’s well north of $2 million in economic impact per game,” says Susan Cohen, president of the Clemson Area Chamber of Commerce. Hotels sell out rooms at $400 a night; some shops bring in 50% of their year’s revenue during the seven home-game weekends. Add in massive broadcasting contracts and apparel deals that enrich schools directly, and there are hundreds of millions of reasons that universities with large athletic departments and the towns they occupy don’t want to lose even one season to COVID-19.

And that’s just the dollars. There is also the intangible value of a community rallying behind a shared passion in particularly bleak times—to say nothing of the life-changing impact of scholarships to students who might have no other chance to shine or get a college education.
College sports are a multibillion-dollar industry, but in 2020 they’re being brought down by the same forces that have hobbled the rest of the economy. Events like football games make for an ideal environment to spread a highly contagious disease. And even if the games end up taking place in empty stadiums, players can still infect one another—they’re in close contact for long pe…

Source: TIME: HealthCategory: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

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Authors: Jothimani D, Daniel H, Danielraj S, Ramachandran H, Rela M
PMID: 32738853 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Authors: Pahlajani D
PMID: 32738852 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Authors: Naik S, Acharya V
PMID: 32738851 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Authors: Chopra HK, Hiremath SM, Wander GS, Kumar AS, Naik S
PMID: 32738846 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Conclusion: The prevalence of Abnormal Liver function tests in patients of COVID-19 is 59.04%. Abnormal liver functions were more in males. The average stay in hospital for COVID-19 patients with abnormal LFTs was longer than those with normal LFTs.
PMID: 32738845 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Conclusions: This hospital-based registry shows that mildly symptomatic or asymptomatic young covid-19 patients have excellent prognosis.
PMID: 32738843 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Conclusion: Lymphopenia is an effective and reliable indicator of onset of symptoms and severity of disease in COVID-19 patients. RDW was found to be higher in COVID 19 patients in comparison to normal patients, however it had no significant relationship with appearance of symptoms or severity of the disease.
PMID: 32738839 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Authors: Tiwaskar M, Vora A
PMID: 32738833 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Devyn Holliday, Research Officer, Economic, Youth &Sustainable Development Directorate
 
This blog is part of the seminar series on ‘The Economics of COVID-19’.By Devyn HollidayJun 10 2020 (IPS-Partners) When countries shuttered their shops, closed their markets, and cordoned off places of gathering to help ward off the coronavirus, they did so out of immediate concern for the health and wellbeing of their citizens.

However, as these measures endure the virus is no longer the sole threat to the health and wellbeing of citizens. People across the globe are facing mounting threats to their wellbeing c…

Source: IPS Inter Press Service – HealthCategory: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Economy & Trade Health Labour Source Type: news

There is both promise and peril in being a pioneer, and the people of Hokkaido have learned both lessons well over the past few months. After infections of COVID-19 on the Japanese island exploded following its annual winter festival this year, officials in February declared a state of emergency to control the disease. Soon after, new daily cases plummeted, and Hokkaido’s quick action was heralded as a beacon for the rest of Japan to follow.
But it wasn’t just infections that dropped; over the next month, agriculture and tourism business also dried up, and Hokkaido’s governor decided to ease social restri…

Source: TIME: HealthCategory: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

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